Friday, August 22, 2014
  • White People: *back flips over actual KKK members*
  • White People: *moonwalks past real neo-nazi blogs*
  • White People: *goes into PoCs inbox*
  • White People: You're whats keeping racism alive

Anonymous said: I'm black/white completely but my mom has always told me that when I was a kid people INSISTED I was east Asian. She'd take me to this little Chinese restaurant and the people who ran it would laugh and be like "hey look it's the Chinese kid" (I'm assuming this is not what they said verbatim). I think it's one of those weird being racially ambiguous things. If you have almond shaped eyes people jump to Asian. If I have a tan people then leapfrog to Latino.

^

What are your favorite lgbtqia POC blogs?

I’m trying to follow more for my own sake and for resources for you all.

— Jay

Anonymous said: so im one of those genetic anomalies who has very far (presumably great great grandmother) chinese heritage however i was born with very prominent chinese features (to the point where even my dad thought my mom cheated //3 dna tests later showed she hadnt//) i have no way of explaining to people although im born to mixed/arab parents im ridiculously pale and have obvious chinese features. cont

thisisnotchina:

cont. my grandma form my fathers side is a jewish israeli and during the establishment of israel was a spy. family records were burnt during this time. from what i was told by her, i do have some sort of chinese heritage but no way of tracing it. i’ve always identified as middle-eastern / french (my mother is half french) but as i grow older and my features become more prominent i dont fit in anywhere because of my face. im called a foreigner by arabs and well i cant bond with asians. cont

cont i cant bond with asians because i’ve never had the explanation to explain myself? like im 1/24th asian but somehow my g-g-g-grandmother manifested herself in me to look 100%? over teh last week alone while shopping near a jrock (yeh im a fan sort of) merch area, 9 people talked to me and asked about my ethnicity or in particular “what asian country are you from” and i get weird looks when i say im arab. as members of the asian community yourself, how would u advice me to deal with this?

to me, it sounds like you’re surrounded people who are trying to police your identity based on narrow perceptions of what people of X ethnicity (including their own) look like. i’ve personally met many central asian people who could certainly pass for part chinese (not to mention there are turkic people who are ethnic minorities in china). inland Asia — from China through Central Asia to West Asia or “the Middle East” — is a hugely diverse area and i think many people don’t realise this. i have met people from India to Afghanistan who are pegged as “Chinese” or “[East] Asian?” because they don’t fit into what people think “Indians” (not an ethnicity) or “Afghanis” (not an ethnicity) look like.

in other words, fuck what everyone else thinks! if you identify as Arab based on your knowledge of your family history and on your upbringing, it is your right to do so. i do encourage you to find out more about your family’s cultural history in general, since you don’t have access to family records. learn about migration histories in the parts of the Middle East you’re from, learn about personal histories through what your parents and extended family can tell you. as you find out more, the way you identify yourself may evolve or become more complex, but don’t feel the need to identify yourself in a way to fit other people’s (uninformed) notions of ethnicity. you don’t have to identify as chinese because it’s more “believable” to people when it sounds like you yourself don’t actually identify as chinese and know nothing about your maybe chinese side.

hope this helped.

-n

heroineheroine:

Things people say to me because I have locs…

" i love your extensions !"
” what extensions did you use ?”
” I love your braids !”
” I thought those were braids “
” is that your real hair ?”
” is that all yours ?”
” oh .. . your hair doesn’t stink ”
” do you listen to Bob Marley ?”
” you smoke weed don’t you ?”
” can I touch your hair ?”
” you like getting your dreads pulled ? ”
*white person with dreads * ” I love your dreads , I wish my hair was like yours !”
” do you wash dreads ?”
” can you wash those ? How ?”
” do your dreads come out when you wash them ? Retwist them ?”
” you need your hair done ”
” are you rasta ?”
” shake dem dreads ”
“You’re pretty for a darkskin girl with dreads ”
” you’re pretty for a girl with dreads ”
” I don’t usually like girls with dreads but …”
” my sisters uncles grandmothers daddy’s nephews girlfriend hates dreads and thinks they’re dirty ”
” can you put them together to make one big dread ?”
” medusa !”
” you look like whoopi “
” you remind me of a mop ”
” let’s tie our dreads together ”
” what do you think about white people with dreads ?”
” you have dreads on your p*ssy?”
” only gay girls have dreads ”
” I thought you were going to be ghetto because you have dreads ”
” can I touch them ?”
” they’re rough ”
” what’s inside your dreads ?”
” oh they’re matted ”
” your babies are going to come out with dreads ”
” do dreads hurt ?”
” I would never get dreads girl I don’t know how you do it ”
” you can’t have dreads to work here ”
” is there something you can do with your hair ?”
” so it’s like that forever ?”
*dude trying to come at me * ” so you going to retwist my dreads for me ?”


The list really goes on …

I think my picture was appropriate for this post cause that’s how I be looking for real ….

18mr:

If you’re like us, you’re asking what you can do for #Ferguson. Pakou Her, our Campaign Director, writes: 
The answer is this: As Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Ferguson is a call to action and solidarity. While our experiences with racism are not the same as the trauma of racism lived by Black people, there are plenty of reasons to be enraged about the damage being wrought by systemic oppression. If we as AAPIs fail to act, if we remain silent and choose to fill the shoes of the “model minority,” we have chosen the side of oppression.
Today, you and I can choose to disrupt the status quo and demand justice for Michael Brown – and it doesn’t require living in Ferguson or even traveling there. Here are three things you can do right now:

DONATE to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund. The funds collected through the fund will be used by the Brown family to cover funeral and burial expenses, as well as travel and living expenses for Michael’s parents as they pursue justice for their son.
SUPPORT grassroots groups and cultural media outlets that are reporting in real time from the ground in Ferguson. You can honor the leadership of young Black organizers by following the Million Hoodies Movement for Justice – follow them on Twitter, and like them on Facebook.
SIGN this petition by Color of Change calling on the Department of Justice to issue a thorough investigation of anti-Black police brutality and excessive use of force by the Ferguson Police Department. 

At this very moment, the situation in Ferguson is growing increasingly worse. Community organizers, journalists, and residents are facing brutal assaults on their safety and civil rights at the hands of a militarized police force; officers in tanks and clad in riot gear are firing rubber coated bullets and smoke grenades into crowds of peaceful protesters; and the police have turned to raiding churches and safe zones where protestors are storing the materials they need to treat those who are teargassed and otherwise injured.
AAPIs cannot stand on the sidelines. As Soya Jung, Senior Partner at ChangeLab says, “… Asian Americans often end up somewhere in the chasm between blackness and whiteness – whether pushed there, largely invisible and struggling to dodge the crossfire, or diving in to eagerly reap the rewards of non-blackness. Our options are invisibility, complicity, or resistance, and black rage is a clarion call for standing on the correct side of the color line, for reaping the collective rewards of justice … I choose resistance.”
Let’s channel our sorrow and immobility into power and action. Let’s step into solidarity to fight for the humanity and civil rights of Black people and communities. Let’s be the change we want to see in the world.
(The illustration is of a print created in response to the killing of Michael Brown by Mary Engelbreit, a renowned artist and St. Louis resident. You can purchase a copy of the print here. All proceeds from print sales will go directly to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund.)

18mr:

If you’re like us, you’re asking what you can do for #Ferguson. Pakou Her, our Campaign Director, writes: 

The answer is this: As Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Ferguson is a call to action and solidarity. While our experiences with racism are not the same as the trauma of racism lived by Black people, there are plenty of reasons to be enraged about the damage being wrought by systemic oppression. If we as AAPIs fail to act, if we remain silent and choose to fill the shoes of the “model minority,” we have chosen the side of oppression.

Today, you and I can choose to disrupt the status quo and demand justice for Michael Brown – and it doesn’t require living in Ferguson or even traveling there. Here are three things you can do right now:

  1. DONATE to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund. The funds collected through the fund will be used by the Brown family to cover funeral and burial expenses, as well as travel and living expenses for Michael’s parents as they pursue justice for their son.
  2. SUPPORT grassroots groups and cultural media outlets that are reporting in real time from the ground in Ferguson. You can honor the leadership of young Black organizers by following the Million Hoodies Movement for Justice – follow them on Twitter, and like them on Facebook.
  3. SIGN this petition by Color of Change calling on the Department of Justice to issue a thorough investigation of anti-Black police brutality and excessive use of force by the Ferguson Police Department. 

At this very moment, the situation in Ferguson is growing increasingly worse. Community organizers, journalists, and residents are facing brutal assaults on their safety and civil rights at the hands of a militarized police force; officers in tanks and clad in riot gear are firing rubber coated bullets and smoke grenades into crowds of peaceful protesters; and the police have turned to raiding churches and safe zones where protestors are storing the materials they need to treat those who are teargassed and otherwise injured.

AAPIs cannot stand on the sidelines. As Soya Jung, Senior Partner at ChangeLab says, “… Asian Americans often end up somewhere in the chasm between blackness and whiteness – whether pushed there, largely invisible and struggling to dodge the crossfire, or diving in to eagerly reap the rewards of non-blackness. Our options are invisibility, complicity, or resistance, and black rage is a clarion call for standing on the correct side of the color line, for reaping the collective rewards of justice … I choose resistance.”

Let’s channel our sorrow and immobility into power and action. Let’s step into solidarity to fight for the humanity and civil rights of Black people and communities. Let’s be the change we want to see in the world.

(The illustration is of a print created in response to the killing of Michael Brown by Mary Engelbreit, a renowned artist and St. Louis resident. You can purchase a copy of the print here. All proceeds from print sales will go directly to the Michael Brown Memorial Fund.)

prettypinktoys:

Cabbage Patch Kid

prettypinktoys:

Cabbage Patch Kid

Anonymous said: Hey the gofoundme twitter page just updated that they have closed the Darren Wilson campaign!!!

postracialcomments:

karrius:

postracialcomments:

The campaign is still up and people are still able to donate. They just “deleted” the comments

So basically all they’re doing is hiding the obvious racism involved, making it even harder for people to show how the existence of the fund is inherently bigoted in nature.

Amazing. Talk about pretending to work for one group while stabbing them in the back.

Yeah

So fyi to everyone, find another crowd funding website to use!

hbicprettyprincess:

blackgirlsparadise:

postracialcomments:

In response to the GoFundMe Campaign for Darren Wilson, people are asking GoFundMe to close the account due to the fact that it incites hate and obviously violates their terms and conditions

The donors and the comments attached to the campaign are sick and simply racist. They asking for the “Killing of N*****s”, “purging the savages” and to support a “fellow White” individual that has the right to murder Black people.

Pass this around. Report the Darren Wilson page as for the violation

http://www.gofundme.com/supportofficerwilson

I will add their contact info as soon as I find it. 

Everyone please reblog, then go on twitter and send a demand to @gofundme to take the Darren Wilson fundraiser down. Please!!

Im physically ill looking at this. *sigh*

yoisthisracist:

kateceratops posted this:

People are giving Wilson money to thank him for killing an unarmed black teenager. Please report this to GoFundMe, as it violates their Terms of Service and they get 5% of the tens of thousands of dollars being donated. Click to report.
This is my message, in case you want to copy and paste:
Your Terms of Service prohibit “items that promote… hate, racial intolerance, or the financial exploitation of a crime.” Take a look at the comments that come with the donations on this page and tell me that doesn’t violate your terms. “Support Officer Wilson” is a thin veil for people rewarding Wilson for killing a black kid.

yoisthisracist:

kateceratops posted this:

People are giving Wilson money to thank him for killing an unarmed black teenager. Please report this to GoFundMe, as it violates their Terms of Service and they get 5% of the tens of thousands of dollars being donated. Click to report.

This is my message, in case you want to copy and paste:

Your Terms of Service prohibit “items that promote… hate, racial intolerance, or the financial exploitation of a crime.” Take a look at the comments that come with the donations on this page and tell me that doesn’t violate your terms. “Support Officer Wilson” is a thin veil for people rewarding Wilson for killing a black kid.